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Below are three photos to give you an idea of how much product you will receive in each size package. We filled up each size bag with marbles and placed them next to a quarter to provide a clear representation. There are two different photos, one for standard spices/seasonings and one for herbs. Since many herbs are so leafy the same weight will fill up a much larger bag. This is why some of the herb prices seem a lot higher than the spice prices, but you are actually receiving more product.

The third image is of our 1 cup Bottle with Sifter next to a popular national brand found in most grocery stores. You can see that our bottle holds close to 2.5 times more product than the national brand bottle. Plus, ours often costs less! Please be aware some other online retailers only offer 1/2 cup(4 fluid ounces) bottles. We choose to offer double the size 1 cup (8 fluid ounces) bottles to give you the biggest bang for your buck!

We hope you can see from these images that regardless of which size you order, you are getting a lot of product and a very good value compared to the supermarket.

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Apple Tarte Tatin

This delicious French apple tarte is easier to make than it looks! It is ordinarily made without salt or spices, but the My Spice Sage version changes things up a bit with Ceylon cinnamon, ground nutmeg, golden vanilla cane sugar and pink Himalayan salt.

  • Yield:4

  • Level of Difficulty:Easy

  • Cook Time:1 Hours

  • Prep Time:30 Minutes

Ingredients

  • 6

    ranny smith apples cored, peeled and quartered

  • 1 cup

    golden vanilla cane sugar

  • 1/8 teaspoon

    Ceylon cinnamon

  • 1/8 teaspoon

    ground nutmeg

  • 1 pinch

    pink Himalayan salt, fine

  • 6 tablespoons

    unsalted butter

  • 1 sheet

    store bought puff pastry dough

Directions

Dry apples in refrigerator for two hours on top of paper towels.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees Farenheit (204 degrees Celcius.)

Combine golden cane vanilla sugar, pink Himalayan salt, Ceylon cinnamon and ground nutmeg in a small bowl.

Melt butter over medium high heat coating bottom and ½ an inch of sides of a 10 inch skillet evenly.

Pour sugar on top of melted butter, coating bottom of pan evenly. Whisk sugar and butter together until sugar is soaked and resembles wet sand.

Lay out apples in pan, in concentric circles, cored side up. Keep heat on medium high for nine minutes and turn up to high for last minute. Sugar should be bubbling and have a rich dark caramel color.* Not all apple slices will fit in the pan at first, but you will be able to fit more in as the apple slices in the pan reduce in size over heat.

While you are waiting for the sugar to caramelize, Roll out your cold sheet of puff pastry dough with enough room to fit over the apples in your skillet. You should be able to tuck some overhang dough, over the sides of the apples into the pan. If you like things to look perfect, you can cut an 11 inch circle out of the dough to cover the apples with.

Once sugar has finished caramelizing, turn heat off and place puff pastry dough on top.

Place skillet in oven for 30 minutes, or until dough is golden brown.

Remove tarte from oven and place lid over skillet and leave slightly ajar, CAREFULLY drain any excess water from skillet. Stop draining if you see caramel sauce coming out.

After draining, CAREFULLY flip tarte upside down onto large serving plate, allow to cool for ten minutes. Eat while tarte is still warm.

*It is a bit more difficult to gauge how well the sugar is caramelizing when you are using a sugar with vanilla seeds in it--the color of the sugar is darker. If you are inexperienced with Tarte Tatin, you might want to make the recipe with plain, white granulated sugar first to observe the stages of caramelization.



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